Monday, December 8, 2008

Fate Fantastic edited by Martin H. Greenberg and Daniel M. Hoyt

"Ascent" by Julie E. Czernada. I had no idea what this story was about nor am I going to waste time and brain cells to guess. "Approaching Sixty" by Mike Resnick and Barry N. Malzberg. I'm not Jewish nor do I gamble so this story tended to confuse me on both those fronts. "But World Enough" by Sarah A. Hoyt. This one was a take on Hannibal Barca, Hamilcar Barca's son, life and death. I didn't know the history beforehand and even after I read up on the history, the story still didn't interest me mainly because of the confusing flashbacks. "Consigned" by Alan Dean Foster. I don't even remember what this story was about. "My Girlfriend Fate" by Darwin A. Garrison. This probably would've been a better story without all the sexual innuendos and post-modern angst. "A Rat's Tale" by Barbara Nickless. This was actual a good story. A little sci-fi-ish piece in the distant future about how martyrs are made. "The Bones of Mammoth Malone" by Esther M. Friesner. This was the best of the bunch. Mammoth Malone is a bone reader and Randi Vixen is the damsel in distress who comes to him to help figure out why lemmings are no longer jumping off the cliffs. It's like pulp fiction in the ice-age. I loved this story. "Death and Taxes" by Kristine Kathryn Rusch. I had no idea what the purpose was behind this story. This one's about a social experiment gone wrong, so the story followed suit. "Fate Dogs" by Robert Hoyt. This one's about a guy who buys hotdogs who can control his fate until he realizes life's more fun without them. "The Man with One Bright Eye" by Jay Lake. This one was about a goddess who decides to create an arrogant, self-centered, over-sexed idiot as a son and how he hoodwinks the women around him. "A Tapestry of Souls" by Paul Crilley. A small boy learns very early that all's fair in love and war, sometimes when the mean the same thing. "The Final Choice" by Irene Radford. Death has an appointment to keep, if only he can remember what it is and why is he always drawn to this woman who's not in his appointment book. "The Prophecy of Symon the Inept" by Rebecca Lickiss. This story was enjoyable. A man goes through great lengths to ensure the Symon's prophecy comes true, which it does, but not the way he expects but definitely what he deserves. "Choice of the Oracles" by Kate Paulk. Another futuristic sci-fi bit where Oracles (computers) run things until one of the workers questions their commands. "Camelot's Greatest Hits" by Laura Resnick. It's Battle of the Bands and King Arthur is leading them; why, oh, why did Merlin take this job. "Jack" by Dave Freer. A spirit named Jack haunts the woods guarding a very precious secret, but not everything is as it seems, including Jack herself.

Overall, not too bad. There were some stories I didn't like or couldn't get into, but the others made up for it.

5 comments:

Amanda said...

I suppose that's what you get with a collection of short stories. I often find I like some and dislike others. Would you consider this collection better or worse than the last collection you reviewed?

Christina said...

I think this collection was worse than Misspelled. It could be because Misspelled matched more of my quirky taste in humor and reading. Some of the stories in Fate Fantastic I just didn't get or like. What's interesting is Jule E. Czerneda write the first story which was too ambiguous for me to comprehend, but she's also the same person who edited Misspelled.

Amanda said...

Yeah, I noticed her name in there.

hamilcar barca said...

wow! they really did a tale about one of my sons, eh? i'll have to search for this book this weekend.

seriously, this sounds like an interstingly-themed anthology. is it aimed at Young Adults, or at the general public?

Christina said...

I thought of you when I read "But World Enough." I would say this anthology is aimed at the general public. Many adult themes and situations. Only one bordered "young adult" and I would say the story was geared toward the late 20-something crowd.